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Legislation watch

2014 House Bill 5385: Expand drunk driving provisions to include illegal drugs

Public Act 315 of 2014

Introduced by Rep. Dan Lauwers (R) on March 4, 2014 To expand the law that requires a person arrested for drunk driving to take a chemical test so that it also applies to drug tests.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Judiciary Committee on March 4, 2014
Reported in the House on May 15, 2014 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-3) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered in the House on May 28, 2014
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on May 28, 2014
Amendment offered by Rep. Tom McMillin (R) on May 28, 2014 To repeal the provision of law that imposes driver license "points" for traffic infractions, with license suspensions for having 12 or more points in two years.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on May 28, 2014
Amendment offered by Rep. Dan Lauwers (R) on June 3, 2014 To establish that if enacted the bill will go into effect 90 days afterwards.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on June 3, 2014
Passed 101 to 8 in the House on June 3, 2014 To expand the law that requires a person stopped for drunk driving to take a breathalyzer or field sobriety test so that it instead refers to "a preliminary roadside analysis," expanding this law to suspected driving while drugged cases. The bill would not explicitly authorize the use of a roadside saliva test for marijuana, which has been challenged as inaccurate. This is part of a package extending the same or similar procedures to both drunk and drugged driving cases.
Received in the Senate on June 4, 2014
Referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 4, 2014
Reported in the Senate on September 11, 2014 With the recommendation that the substitute (S-2) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Passed 35 to 0 in the Senate on October 1, 2014 (same description)
To expand the law that requires a person stopped for drunk driving to take a breathalyzer or field sobriety test so that it instead refers to "a preliminary roadside analysis," expanding this law to suspected driving while drugged cases. The bill would not explicitly authorize the use of a roadside saliva test for marijuana, which has been challenged as inaccurate. This is part of a package extending the same or similar procedures to both drunk and drugged driving cases.
Received in the House on October 2, 2014
Passed 104 to 3 in the House on October 2, 2014 To concur with the House-passed version of the bill.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on October 14, 2014

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