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2014 House Bill 5931: Revise sanctions for parole violations
Introduced by Rep. Joseph Haveman (R) on October 6, 2014 To make a number of changes to criminal parole practices and procedures. Among these are reserving revocation of parole for more serious parole violations, requiring a prisoner to be paroled upon completion of the court-imposed minimum sentence, and for prisoners sentenced after the bill goes into effect, requiring prisoners denied parole upon completion of their minimum sentence to be paroled at least nine months before the end of their maximum sentence, to ensure a period of supervision in the community.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on October 6, 2014
Reported in the House on November 12, 2014 Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.
Substitute offered by Rep. Joseph Haveman (R) on December 4, 2014 To adopt much more limited version of the bill.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on December 4, 2014
Amendment offered by Rep. Joseph Haveman (R) on December 4, 2014 To make the bill's provisions prospective only.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 4, 2014
Passed 91 to 18 in the House on December 4, 2014.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To establish a "presumption" that prisoners convicted of non-violent and drug offenses, or who are deemed unlikely to be a "menace to society," should be released on parole after serving the minimum sentence, with many exceptions, and no release requirement.
Received in the Senate on December 9, 2014
Referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee on December 9, 2014
Failed 12 to 26 in the Senate on December 18, 2014.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To establish a "presumption" that prisoners convicted of non-violent and drug offenses, or who are deemed unlikely to be a "menace to society," should be released on parole after serving the minimum sentence, with many exceptions, and no release requirement.

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