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2009 Senate Bill 981: Authorize failing school “turnaround” procedures

Public Act 205 of 2009

  1. Introduced by Sen. Wayne Kuipers (R) on November 10, 2009, to establish a process by which failed public schools could be placed under the control of a “turnaround school chief educational officer,” who could reassign (but not fire) employees, suspend employee seniority systems and union work rules, and control curriculum and discretionary spending. Alternatively, management of a failing school could be contracted to a charter school management company.
    • Referred to the Senate Education Committee on November 10, 2009.
      • Reported in the Senate on December 2, 2009, with the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the Senate on December 2, 2009, to replace the previous version of the bill with one that waters down the powers of the school turnaround officers, and also imposes new certification and/or advanced degree mandates on school superintendents and principals. The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on December 2, 2009.
    • Amendment offered by Sen. Liz Brater (D) on December 2, 2009, to require charter schools to report the number of special education students. The amendment passed 20 to 16 in the Senate on December 2, 2009.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

      • Motion in the Senate on December 2, 2009, to reconsider the vote by which the amendment offered by Senator Brater was adopted. The motion passed by voice vote in the Senate on December 2, 2009.
        • Amendment offered by Sen. Liz Brater (D) on December 2, 2009, to require charter schools to report the number of special education students. The amendment passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on December 2, 2009.
          Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  2. Passed 28 to 8 in the Senate on December 2, 2009, to establish a process by which failed public schools could be placed under the control of a “turnaround school chief educational officer,” who could request renegotiation of union work rules and tenure provisions, but would not have the authority to invalidate provisions determined to be impediments to progress. Alternatively, management of a failing school could be contracted to a charter school management company.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the House on December 2, 2009.
    • Referred to the House Education Committee on December 2, 2009.
    • Substitute offered by Rep. Tim Melton (D) on December 10, 2009, to adopt a version of the bill that includes various measures intended to make Michigan eligible for federal "Race to the Top" grants. The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on December 10, 2009.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Tim Melton (D) on December 10, 2009, to require that charter school manager selected to operate a failed high school may only be one whose existing charters see 80 percent of their students enroll in college. Also, to add other restrictions. The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on December 10, 2009.
  4. Passed 78 to 28 in the House on December 10, 2009, to establish a process by which certain failed public schools could be converted into charter schools, but only if the charter manager meets very retrictive conditions the bill would impose, and only in 37 school districts where graduation rates are currently below 60 percent. The bill would also require school districts to adopt some form of merit pay; eliminate the current Algebra II high school graduation requirement; increase the compulsory school attendance age from 16 to 18; mandate the certification of school administrators; and more. Most (but not all) of these are measures intended to make Michigan eligible for federal "Race to the Top" grants.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Received in the Senate on December 10, 2009.
  6. Failed 1 to 31 in the Senate on December 10, 2009, to concur with a House-passed version of the bill. The vote sends the bill to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  7. Received in the House on December 19, 2009, to adopt a compromise version of the bill reported by a House-Senate conference committee. This would establish a process by not more than 10 failed public schools could be converted into charter schools, and existing charters that meet very high standards could be converted into "school of excellence" charters, freeing a regular charter slot under the existing cap. It is estimated that only around 30 new charters (including "schools of excellence" charters) would be authorized. The bill would also authorize the creation of two statewide "cyber-schools," require school districts to adopt some form of merit pay; essentially eliminate the current Algebra II high school graduation requirement; and mandate the certification of school administrators. Most (but not all) of these are measures intended to make Michigan eligible for federal "Race to the Top" grants. Passed 82 to 17 in the House on December 19, 2009.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  8. Received in the Senate on December 19, 2009. Passed 23 to 8 in the Senate on December 19, 2009.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  9. Motion in the Senate on December 19, 2009, to give the bill immediate effect. The motion passed 24 to 4 in the Senate on December 19, 2009.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  10. Signed by Gov. Jennifer Granholm on January 4, 2010.

Comments

Re: 2009 Senate Bill 981 (Authorize failing school “turnaround” procedures )  by TaterSalad on June 21, 2012 
Your Public School system is broken, yet, the Obama administration continues to fund this system with taxpayers money.

........................ http://www.theblaze.com/blog/2012/06/21/a-picture-is-worth-1000-words-americas-droupouts/

Re: 2009 Senate Bill 981 (Authorize failing school “turnaround” procedures )  by chadhudson on June 21, 2012 
One year after my son graduated high-school the school was placed under the control of a turnaround school chief educational officer and we all were shocked by this news. Now he is making Master degree while his younger brother is learning at the same high-school that suffered a lot of changes, the chief educational officer decided to let a charter school management company to handle the situation because they have more experience in this. Now the school is one of the best in our county and we are proud with that.


Re: 2009 Senate Bill 981 (Authorize failing school “turnaround” procedures )  by cen20474 on November 14, 2010 

 Personality I think all teacher should be accountable wheather they have 10yr or not if they are not doing a good job of teachering children they should put on a list and repermaned or fired.This setting around on there buts and drawing a salary with the 10yr is complete bullshit.



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