Legislation watch
Mackinac Center for Public Policy
Capitol Building

2011 House Bill 4158: Repeal item pricing mandate

Public Act 15 of 2011

  1. Introduced by Rep. Lisa Lyons (R) on January 27, 2011, to repeal the state’s “item pricing” law, which mandates retailers place price tags on every item of merchandise, with certain exceptions. The measure was recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder in his first State of the State address.
    • Referred to the House Commerce Committee on January 27, 2011.
      • Reported in the House on February 15, 2011, with the recommendation that the substitute (H-3) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the House on February 15, 2011, to replace the previous version of the bill with one that has a $100,000 appropriation for a "public awareness" campaign, and revises other details. The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on February 15, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Tim Melton (D) on February 15, 2011, to require that a retail customer who seeks to collect the penalty bonus from a retailer who overcharges for an item due to a scanner error must have a receipt that CLEARLY describes the item. The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 15, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Vicki Barnett (D) on February 15, 2011, to extend prohibitions on certain improper merchandise marketing techniques (like "bait and switch," etc.) to real estate sales, and insert in this statute also provisions from the civil rights law banning discrimination in retail marketing. The amendment failed 47 to 63 in the House on February 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Rep. Kate Segal (D) on February 15, 2011, to prohibit a retailer from increasing the price on an item more than once a day. The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 15, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Jon Switalski (D) on February 15, 2011, to strip out a $100,000 appropriation added to the bill to pay for a public awareness campaign about the proposed item price law changes. The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 15, 2011.
  2. Passed 69 to 41 in the House on February 16, 2011, to repeal the state’s “item pricing” law, which mandates retailers place price tags on every item of merchandise, with certain exceptions. The measure was recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder in his first State of the State address.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the Senate on February 17, 2011.
    • Referred to the Senate Economic Development Committee on February 17, 2011.
      • Reported in the Senate on March 9, 2011, with the recommendation that the bill pass.
    • Amendment offered by Sen. Virgil Smith, Jr. (D) on March 15, 2011, to give additional retail price marking enforcement duties to the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. John Gleason (D) on March 15, 2011, to retain the item pricing mandate for nonpresciption drugs. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Glenn Anderson (D) on March 15, 2011, to increase the penalties for retail scanner errors. The amendment failed 16 to 21 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Tupac Hunter (D) on March 15, 2011, to not repeal the item pricing mandate, but allow stores a limited number of exemptions for items they choose. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Virgil Smith, Jr. (D) on March 15, 2011, to not appropriate $100,000 for a public information campaign about the repeal of this law. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Coleman Young (D) on March 15, 2011, to prohibit a retailer from increasing the price on an item more than once a day. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Virgil Smith, Jr. (D) on March 15, 2011, to require the Michigan Economic Development Corporation to prepare a report after six months on whether retail stores reduced the number of employees overall because they no longer were mandated to put price tags on every item. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Morris Hood, III (D) on March 15, 2011, to not repeal the item pricing mandate, but allow stores a limited number of exemptions for items they choose. The amendment failed 11 to 26 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  4. Passed 24 to 13 in the Senate on March 15, 2011, to repeal the state’s “item pricing” law, which mandates that retailers must place price tags on every item of merchandise, with certain exceptions. The measure was recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Motion in the Senate on March 15, 2011, to allow the repeal of the item pricing mandate to go into effect immediately. Without this "immediate effect" vote, retailers will have to keep putting price tags on ever item until March, 2012. The motion failed 25 to 12 in the Senate on March 15, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  6. Motion in the Senate on March 16, 2011. The motion failed 25 to 12 in the Senate on March 16, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  7. Moved to reconsider in the Senate on March 17, 2011, the vote by which the bill was passed. The motion passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 17, 2011.
  8. Received in the Senate on March 17, 2011.
  9. Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate on March 17, 2011, to repeal the state’s “item pricing” law, which mandates retailers place price tags on every item of merchandise, with certain exceptions. The measure was recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder, and will now go into effect on Sept. 1, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  10. Motion in the Senate on March 17, 2011, to give the bill immediate effect. The motion passed 31 to 7 in the Senate on March 17, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  11. Received in the House on March 17, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Sen. Mike Kowall (R) on March 17, 2011, to make the item pricing repeal effective as of takes effect Sept. 1, 2011. The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 17, 2011.
  12. Passed 69 to 41 in the House on March 17, 2011, to concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill, which made the repeal effective as of Sept. 1, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  13. Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on March 28, 2011.

Comments

Re: 2011 House Bill 4158 (Repeal item pricing mandate )  by lrhogan on April 2, 2012 

 ME TOO and for the same reason!



Re: 2011 House Bill 4158 (Repeal item pricing mandate )  by lrhogan on April 2, 2012 

 I like regulations.  They keep people honest.  Well, some people.  Right now there is almost no one watching our meat supply in Michigan.  We could be eating sickly chicken and worse, giving it to our children.  I like clean water.  I like the bridges checked out now and then to make sure they are not going to fall on the cars below.  If I were one of the governors neighbors in A2, I would like to put an outhouse in my yard (if you listened to this years State of the State address)  next to the Govenors patio where he has his BBQs.  There are reasons they made laws for outhouses.  Why doesn't anyone check this stuff out before getting rid of a regulation?  What brought the law/regulation about is important too.



Re: 2011 House Bill 4158 (Repeal item pricing mandate )  by changeagent on June 1, 2011 

[quote user="gypsy"]Really? You mean the grocery stores will lower the price of food because they don't have to mark the products? They won't just pocket the savings?[/quote]


Grocery stores have to compete and they have to profitable.  They will keep as much savings in profit as they can get away with.  The funny thing about competition is that it eventually forces them to lower prices because their competitor did so in an attempt to take more market share.  By increasing market share they can increase the amount of profit while actually lowering prices.



View More pre-2013 Comments.
Your new comments should be made in the box below.