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2011 House Bill 4325: Appropriations: K-12, colleges and universities

Public Act 62 of 2011

  1. Introduced by Rep. Chuck Moss (R) on February 23, 2011, the executive recommendation for a Fiscal Year 2011-2012 and FY 2012-2013 school aid, community college and university budget. In FY 2011-2012 this would appropriate $12.173 billion for K-12 public schools and $1.362 billion for universities, compared to $13.134 billion and $1.578 billion respectively in the current year (which includes the last of the federal “stimulus” money). Community colleges would get $295 million in FY 2011-2012, the same as this year. Per-pupil school aid formula payments to public schools would be reduced by $300 from current-year levels.
    • Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on February 23, 2011.
      • Reported in the House on April 28, 2011, with the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the House on May 5, 2011, to adopt a version of this budget that expresses the fiscal and policy preferences of the Republican-majority in the House on various spending items and programs. For details see analysis from the non-partisan House Fiscal Agency. The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on May 5, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. Edward McBroom (R) on May 5, 2011, to add a "placeholder" for potential extra funding to be added later for small rural school districts with declinging enrollment. The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on May 5, 2011.
    • Amendment offered by Rep. David Agema (R) on May 5, 2011, to cut 5 percent from universities that provide health insurance benefits to the domestic partners of unmarried employees. The savings would diverted to the K-12 school budget. The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on May 5, 2011.
  2. Passed 57 to 53 in the House on May 5, 2011, the House version of the Fiscal Year 2011-2012 school aid, community college and university budgets. A separate House budget authorizes the rest of state government spending (House Bill 4526). This bill would appropriate $12.26 billion for K-12 public schools, compared to $12.17 billion recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder and $13.13 billion the previous year (which was inflated by $420 million in “stimulus” and other federal money, including required state matching funds). Per-pupil grants would be reduced by around $270 (exact amount varies by district), vs. a $300 reduction proposed by the Governor, and a $170 cut passed by the Senate.

    The bill also appropriates $1.36 billion for state universities, the amount recommended by the Governor, compared to $1.58 billion the previous year. Community colleges would get $251.9 million, vs. $295.8 million last year, which was also the amount recommended by Gov. Snyder. $795 million of the college and university budgets would come from tax revenue earmarked to the School Aid Fund, which in the past has mostly been used just for K-12 funding. The House concurs with the Governor’s proposal to cut more from universities that raise tuition by more than 7.1 percent. In contrast, the Senate-passed budget uses less School Aid Fund money for colleges and universities, and does not have the university tuition restraint penalties.The House also penalizes universities that provide domestic partner benefits to unmarried employees.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the Senate on May 11, 2011.
    • Substitute offered in the Senate on May 11, 2011, to replace the House-passed version of the bill with one that replaces all the appropriations with $100 "placeholders," which is a means of advancing the budget to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences. The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on May 11, 2011.
  4. Passed 23 to 14 in the Senate on May 11, 2011, to "adopt" a version of the House Fiscal Year 2011-2012 school aid, community college and university budgets, but in fact replace all the appropriations with $100 "placeholders." This is essentially a means for sending the budget to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences. The Senate-passed versions of these budgets are in Senate Bills 183, 178 and 171.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Received in the House on May 11, 2011.
  6. Failed 0 to 108 in the House on May 12, 2011, to concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill. The vote sends the bill to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  7. Received in the Senate on May 26, 2011.
  8. Passed 20 to 17 in the Senate on May 26, 2011, to pass the conference report. See description in second vote below.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  9. Moved to reconsider in the Senate on May 26, 2011, the vote by which the conference report was adopted. The motion passed by voice vote in the Senate on May 26, 2011.
  10. Received in the Senate on May 26, 2011, the final House-Senate agreement for the 2011-2012 school, community college and state university budgets. It appropriates $12.66 billion for K-12 public schools, compared to $12.17 billion originally recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder, and $13.13 billion the previous year (inflated by $420 million in “stimulus” and other one-time money). Per-pupil grants would be reduced by $300, but around $100 of that would be “given back” as a pension contribution subsidy, and another $100 to school districts that adopt specified reforms including paying 10 percent of health insurance benefits, refusing the policy terms of the teacher union's insurance company, competitive bidding on non-instructional services, consolidating some services and more transparency. The budget includes $133 million to cover potential transition costs of a possible school employee pension reform.

    The bill also appropriates $1.36 billion for state universities, compared to $1.58 billion the previous year, and more would be cut from universities that raise tuition by more than 7.1 percent. Community colleges would get $283.8 million, compared to $295.8 million last year. $395 million of the college and university budgets would come from tax revenue earmarked to the School Aid Fund, in the past mostly used just for K-12 schools. Passed 21 to 17 in the Senate on May 26, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  11. Motion by Sen. Arlan Meekhof (R) on May 26, 2011, to give the bill immediate effect. The motion passed 26 to 12 in the Senate on May 26, 2011.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  12. Received in the House on May 26, 2011.
  13. Passed 59 to 50 in the House on May 26, 2011, the final House-Senate agreement for the 2011-2012 school, community college and state university budgets. It appropriates $12.66 billion for K-12 public schools, compared to $12.17 billion originally recommended by Gov. Rick Snyder, and $13.13 billion the previous year (inflated by $420 million in “stimulus” and other one-time money). Per-pupil grants would be reduced by $300, but around $100 of that would be “given back” as a pension contribution subsidy, and another $100 to school districts that adopt specified reforms including paying 10 percent of health insurance benefits, refusing the policy terms of the teacher union's insurance company, competitive bidding on non-instructional services, consolidating some services and more transparency. The budget includes $133 million to cover potential transition costs of a possible school employee pension reform.

    The bill also appropriates $1.36 billion for state universities, compared to $1.58 billion the previous year, and more would be cut from universities that raise tuition by more than 7.1 percent. Community colleges would get $283.8 million, compared to $295.8 million last year. $395 million of the college and university budgets would come from tax revenue earmarked to the School Aid Fund, in the past mostly used just for K-12 schools.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  14. Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on June 21, 2011.

Comments

Re: 2011 House Bill 4325 (Appropriations: K-12, colleges and universities )  by marcysmith on January 6, 2013 
Public schools across the country, struggling with cuts in state funding, rising personnel costs and lower tax revenues, are shifting costs to busy students and their parents by imposing or boosting fees for everything from enrolling in honors English to riding the bus. At high schools in several states, it can cost more than $200 just to walk in the door, thanks to registration fees, technology fees and unspecified "instructional fees."

Re: 2011 House Bill 4325 (Appropriations: K-12, colleges and universities )  by mregen on December 6, 2012 
Michigan also has more than 60 independent colleges, universities and an online college that enrolled nearly 88,000 students last year, but these institutions do not receive state funds. The Michigan Constitution grants to the public university boards of control autonomy in all decisions regarding the institutions’ operations and policies.

Re: 2011 House Bill 4325 (Appropriations: K-12, colleges and universities )  by marcysmith on September 21, 2012 
Today, most governments recognize the importance of public health programs or special education degrees in reducing the incidence disease, disability, and the effects of aging and other physical and mental health conditions, although public health generally receives significantly less government funding compared with medicine. In recent years, public health programs providing vaccinations have made incredible strides in promoting health, including the eradication of smallpox, a disease that plagued humanity for thousands of years.

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