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2012 Senate Bill 961: Appropriations: K-12 School Aid budget
  1. Introduced by Sen. Howard Walker (R) on February 14, 2012, to provide a “template” or “place holder” for a Fiscal Year 2012-2013 K-12 School Aid budget. This bill contains no appropriations, but may be amended at a later date to include them.
    • Referred to the Senate Appropriations Committee on February 14, 2012.
      • Reported in the Senate on April 24, 2012, with the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
    • Substitute offered in the Senate on April 25, 2012, to adopt a version of this budget that expresses the fiscal and policy preferences of the Republican-majority in the Senate on various spending items and programs. The substitute passed by voice vote in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
    • Amendment offered by Sen. John Pappageorge (R) on April 25, 2012, to increase the amount given to around 50 so-called "20j" school districts, which tend to be wealthier ones, with some exceptions. The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
    • Amendment offered by Sen. Glenn Anderson (D) on April 25, 2012, to add $550,000 in spending for three particular school districts in the amendment sponsor's district. The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Hoon-Yung Hopgood (D) on April 25, 2012, to add $30 million intended to reduce the difference in spending levels between different school districts. The amendment failed 14 to 24 in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Hoon-Yung Hopgood (D) on April 25, 2012, to provide an additional $177 million to regular and intermediate school districts, to use against the amount they are assessed to cover school employee pensions. Also, to strip out $58 million proposed for creating "computer adaptive" tests for students in grades two through 12 that give students and teachers "immediate feedback" on the student's progress, and providing "incentive grants" to districts that use them. The amendment failed 13 to 25 in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Hoon-Yung Hopgood (D) on April 25, 2012, to cut $1,000 per student from support to charter schools, unless they place their employees in the (heavily underfunded) school employee pension system. The money saved would pay for the optional post-retirement health insurance benefits now provided to school retirees (which unlike cash pension benefits, are completely unfunded). Almost all charter schools provide their employees 401(k)-type retirement benefits, rather than the "defined benefit" pensions and retiree health insurance granted to conventional school employees (a system that was ended for new state employees starting in 1997, and has become very rare outside of government). The amendment failed 12 to 26 in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. Hoon-Yung Hopgood (D) on April 25, 2012, to increase overall school spending by $495 million, and increase per-student spending by $300. The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
      Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

    • Amendment offered by Sen. John Moolenaar (R) on April 25, 2012, to increase the amount given to certain school districts. The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 25, 2012.
  2. Passed 25 to 13 in the Senate on April 25, 2012, the Senate version of the school aid budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $12.712 billion, compared to $12.659 billion authorized the previous year. The bill would increase the per-pupil foundation grant to school districts by between $116 and $232, depending on whether they now get more or less than average. Among many other differences, the Senate significantly watered down and reduced the dollar amounts of "best practices" grants proposed by Gov. Rick Snyder, which distribute some school aid money on the basis of whether schools adopt various fiscal and transparency reforms.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the House on April 25, 2012.
    • Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on April 25, 2012.
    • Substitute offered by Rep. Chuck Moss (R) on May 2, 2012, to strip out all of the appropriations of the Senate-passed version of the bill, which is basically a procedural method of launching negotiations to work out the differences between the House and Senate budgets. The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on May 2, 2012.
  4. Passed 63 to 47 in the House on May 2, 2012, to send the bill back to the Senate "stripped" of all actual appropriations. This vote is basically a procedural method of launching negotiations to work out the differences between the House and Senate budgets.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Received in the Senate on May 3, 2012.
  6. Failed 0 to 38 in the Senate on May 3, 2012, to concur with the House-passed version of the budget. The vote sends the bill to a House-Senate conference committee to work out the differences.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  7. Received in the Senate on May 31, 2012.
  8. Passed 20 to 16 in the Senate on May 31, 2012, the House-Senate conference report for the school aid budget for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, 2012. This would appropriate $12.944 billion, compared to $12.659 billion authorized the previous year. The bill would increase the per-pupil foundation grant to school districts that currently get less than average by $120, and other districts would get smaller increases based on student performance and their adoption of fiscal best practices. The identical budget is included in House Bill 5372.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  9. Received in the House on May 31, 2012.

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