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2015 House Bill 4822: Ban “social promotions” for third graders who can’t read

Public Act 306 of 2016

Introduced by Rep. Amanda Price (R) on August 18, 2015 To prohibit “social promotions” of third graders who have not reached minimum reading proficiency benchmarks specified in the bill.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Education Committee on August 18, 2015
Reported in the House on September 24, 2015 With the recommendation that the substitute (H-5) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Gary Glenn (R) on October 15, 2015 To tweak the "interventions" the bill requires before a still-illiterate third grader may be held back by specifying that they be "systematic, explicit, multisensory and sequential".
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Andy Schor (D) on October 15, 2015 To clarify a provision that requires the parents to be notified if child is "not enrolled in fourth grade" due to the bill's requirements.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Kristy Pagan (D) on October 15, 2015 To narrow the scope of the bill to school districts that get money from and meet the conditions of an existing reading intervention program.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Kristy Pagan (D) on October 15, 2015 To require a still-illiterate third grader's parents to agree that in writing that the benefits of not advancing to fourth grade exceed the potential negative consequences, or else the child would be advanced.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Kristy Pagan (D) on October 15, 2015 To not hold back still-illiterate third graders from advancing to fourth grade, but do require them to remain in third grade reading classes.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Winnie Brinks (D) on October 15, 2015 To move back implementation to the 2018-2019 school year (the final House version moves it back to 2019-2020).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Adam Zemke (D) on October 15, 2015 To authorize lawsuits against school districts in which there are third graders who have not learned how to read, forcing them to spend more to teach them.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Adam Zemke (D) on October 15, 2015 To require schools in which still-illiterate third graders were held back to post specified details on their website (not including student names though).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Jeff Irwin (D) on October 15, 2015 To add $23.9 million to the state budget to pay for more teacher training, more "screening and diagnostic tools," more ISD "literacy coaches" and more money to school districts.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Kathy Crawford (R) on October 15, 2015 To require the state to finish grading statewide third grade reading tests by June 1 each year.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Daniela Garcia (R) on October 15, 2015 To expand an exemption for some students to the proposed policy.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Klint Kesto (R) on October 15, 2015 To change the standard that third graders must meet to advance to fourth from "mastery" to "competence" in reading.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. David Pagel (R) on October 15, 2015 To move the proposed policy back to the 2019-2020 school year.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Martin Howrylak (R) on October 15, 2015 To change a provision that "encourages" school districts to provide extra support to students who are not native English speakers, so it also applies to Hindi and Korean speakers, in addition to Spanish, Chinese or Arabic.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on October 15, 2015
Passed 57 to 48 in the House on October 15, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To prohibit “social promotions” of third graders who have not reached minimum reading benchmarks, subject to many conditions and exceptions, and with requirements that additional "intervention" programs be created (including summer school) and individual tutoring provided before a student is actually held back. This would not take effect until the 2019-2020 school year.
Received in the Senate on October 20, 2015
Referred to the Senate Education Committee on October 20, 2015
Reported in the Senate on March 23, 2016 With the recommendation that the substitute (S-6) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered in the Senate on March 23, 2016 To revise details of the procedures and definitions the bill would institute.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 23, 2016
Passed 31 to 6 in the Senate on March 23, 2016.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To prohibit “social promotions” of third graders who have not reached minimum reading benchmarks, subject to many conditions and exceptions, and with requirements that additional "intervention" programs be created and individual tutoring provided before a student is actually held back. This would not take effect until the 2019-2020 school year.
Received in the House on March 23, 2016
Failed 49 to 59 in the House on March 24, 2016.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To concur with the Senate-passed version of the bill.
Received in the House on September 20, 2016
Passed 60 to 47 in the House on September 21, 2016.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To prohibit “social promotions” of third graders who have not reached minimum reading benchmarks, subject to many conditions and exceptions, and with requirements that additional intervention programs be created and individual tutoring provided before a student is actually held back. This would not take effect until the 2019-2020 school year. This final version of the bill removes a Senate provision to let teachers and principals provide exceptions, and allows a school district superintendent to do so only if the student is proficient in other subjects.
Received in the Senate on September 21, 2016
Passed 25 to 10 in the Senate on September 21, 2016.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To concur with the House-passed version of the bill.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on October 6, 2016

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