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2018 Senate Bill 748: Adjust Michigan income tax exemption for federal tax reform

Public Act 38 of 2018

Introduced by Sen. Jack Brandenburg (R) on January 11, 2018
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax, so as to offset changes in the recently enacted federal tax reform law that reportedly could interact with Michigan law in a way that causes many to owe more state income tax. The bill would immediately increase the state personal exemption to $4,500, and then gradually raise it to $4,800 by 2021. See also House Bill 5404.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Finance Committee on January 11, 2018
Reported in the Senate on January 17, 2018
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered in the Senate on January 17, 2018
To not reduce allocations to the school aid fund that might result from increasing the personal income tax exemption.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on January 17, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. David Knezek (D) on January 17, 2018
To tie-bar the bill to legislation that would repeal the provision of Gov. Rick Snyder's 2011 tax reform and business tax cut that eliminated some of the state income tax exemptions for pension income. This means the bill could not become law unless a bill making that other change is also enacted.
The amendment failed 17 to 20 in the Senate on January 17, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed 37 to 0 in the Senate on January 17, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption that is currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax. The bill would immediately increase it to $4,500, and then gradually to $4,700 by 2020, which with inflation adjustments is projected to be worth around $5,000 by then. Taxpayers can claim a personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each dependent, and these are subtracted from the amount of income that is subject to income tax.
Received in the House on January 17, 2018
Referred to the House Tax Policy Committee on January 17, 2018
Reported in the House on January 31, 2018
Without amendment and with the recommendation that the bill pass.
Substitute offered by Rep. Jim Tedder (R) on February 14, 2018
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that reflects a consensus between the House, Senate and Governor on the size of the tax cut.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2018
Passed 107 to 2 in the House on February 14, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption that is currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax. The bill would immediately increase it to $4,050, and then gradually to $4,900 by 2021, with inflation adjustments thereafter. Taxpayers can claim a personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each dependent, and these are subtracted from the amount of income that is subject to income tax.
Received in the Senate on February 14, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. David Knezek (D) on February 14, 2018
To require that any loss of school aid fund revenue under the bill be filled in with state general fund money.
The amendment failed 17 to 19 in the Senate on February 14, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed 36 to 0 in the Senate on February 14, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
(same description)
To increase the $4,000 personal exemption that is currently allowed under the Michigan state income tax. The bill would immediately increase it to $4,050, and then gradually to $4,900 by 2021, with inflation adjustments thereafter. Taxpayers can claim a personal exemption for themselves, their spouse and each dependent, and these are subtracted from the amount of income that is subject to income tax.
Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder on February 28, 2018

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